Beyond Surviving

In the initial days, weeks and months following the suicide of a loved one, emotions may be very debilitating. So much so that many people wonder how they can survive. One of the most important things to know is that people do survive – and even eventually go beyond just surviving, to experience happy, meaningful and contributory lives. Read encouraging words from survivors.

Joni Greever

Losing a Son – The Lost and Found

By Joni Greever


Being able to look at the big picture – believing that this lifetime is a tiny part of our eternity and that we’ll meet again – has helped tremendously in my healing.

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Franklin Cook

Losing a Parent: Relationships with the Dead Have a Life of Their Own

by Franklin Cook


Even as the reality of my father as a living person slips further and further into the past, his influence in my life – which is now almost exclusively a very positive influence – continues to grow.

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Jan McDaniel

Losing a Spouse: Love Outlasts Pain

by Jan McDaniel


After life-changing loss, there is a period when we are trying to stay with our lost loved ones, a place between death – where they have gone – and life, where we are supposed to be.

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Dan Pallotta

Losing a Partner: Healing According to My Own Schedule

By Dan Pallotta


I am filled with a sense of one powerful, singular truth, which is, if you just stay in the world, have patience and have faith, anything is possible – absolutely anything.

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Kelley Clink

Losing a Sibling: Facing Grief – Finding Life

By Kelley Clink


…the longer I was able to sit with my brother’s death, the more spaces there was for me to breathe again. To laugh. To dance.

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Paul McMickle

Losing Friends: Collateral Damage

By Paul McMickle, Viet Nam Vet


Survivors can heal and live a fulfilled life, despite loss. And you can and will make a difference for others, both those you currently know, and those you’ve yet to meet.

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